How to get good? (at coding.)

I now this sounds silly, but what did people use to actually learn to code? I’m struggling to find a tutorial that I enjoy using, so I figured I could ask the Forums what they used to learn to code and to get good at it.
(Also, im trying to learn Javascript, For better context.)

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@Banesr18 Personally, I recommend W3Schools, as it has amazing tutorials for a variety of languages. When I want to learn a language, I really just copy in other people’s code and combine it and I try to learn it.

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W3Schools is the website I used to learn to code and its great, so I would mainly recommend learning the syntax and main ideas through a tutorial like that and then to just practice a lot.

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I learnt JS at this site. It’s an excellent site that covers concepts from the simplest ones to very complex ones. If you want to learn other languages, W3Schools will be definitely better because the site I use only teaches JavaScript. Also, if you mastered code syntax, you can write production code here at Replit, or start learning advanced algorithms here.

I got introduced to JS when doing a tutorial on an intro to JS on replit.com/learn. It’s called ‘Intro to JS’.
Created by @MattDESTROYER

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lots of people said W3schools already but I’d also like to mention Sololearn, personally not for me (actually I might start using it again :upside_down_face:) but we used it in school, it’s interactive and they have tons of tutorials ranging from beginner to experienced. and like nate mentioned, Matt’s “Intro to JS” tut on Replit


amazing

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To get good at coding in a specific language always require months to years of tries and fails, depending on how good your machine-thinking is (think like a computer, idk how to describe that)
My way is to first try block coding like scratch, as they trains your machine-thinking technique, and also easy compared to text coding, as they limits the choice for programmes to use, therefore no SyntaxError and stuff.
After you think you are ready in different things, you can hop into text coding(like JavaScript you mentioned, or most people actually choose python since it is easier). You can try recreating some simple projects you have done such as printing/logging things, doing math, and slowly into simple games, and finally large projects. At that time you are already ‘good’

Even tho I don’t recommend my method cause it may let people frustrated and give up easily, I just want to share my way for you as an example

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I would highly recommend the Codecademy as a great place to learn pretty much any language. I used it to teach myself JavaScript. I would specifically recommend the Learn JavaScript and Learn intermediate JavaScript courses, which are both free, (there are special tasks that only ‘Pro’ members can access, but you can just skip those).

I would recommend W3Schools as a great resource (rather than for its tutorials) for documentation that is easy for beginners to understand and that has tons of examples. That said, once you’ve been introduced to the language, there really is no substitute for MDN, which is always my goto for JavaScript documentation.

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