Cursed Programming

Heeeey, where’s mine?!?!

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wait where is it can you quote it since i must have looked over that one.

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And maybe you should have just linked the posts instead of pasting the code

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hm…but wouldnt the user have to go to all of the links to see it?

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what if we vote for our own :thinking:

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Yeah but I think it’d be easier because then the user can see them formatted

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Then you know deep inside that you haven’t truly earned that vote, and you will be cursed with that on your conscious.

(plus its all just for fun and games and it doesn’t really matter but heh, whos counting)

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i’m counting

this is a joke; don’t sue me. i am not liable for this message under all legal circumstance
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This is enough to throw me off:

import pandas as numpy
import numpy as pandas
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I’ve seen worse, sadly, Have you ever just strong long long long lines text for variable names that would be used frequently in the code, and then in the “wijfwijebfiwjdbfksjdbfksjdf variables theres keywords like printdefintfkwejhfwlhfkjfstdindiroswritewjnfkwjfw” you get things like that. and then import module as <spawn of hell you've created>

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nonono, not even close:

import pandas as jekall
import numpy as jеkall
import os as jekаll
import sys as jеkаll

:upside_down_face:

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Wait wait wait – you can import those four things and put them all under the same alias?

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evil laugh hahahahahahahaha,
they’re not the same alias.

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huh :confused: ? jekall is used 4 times, for 4 different modules, correct?

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nope, they’re all different. if you’d like an explanation, i’d gladly give you one.

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simple they are using characters from different Unicode character sets.

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do you know what unicode character set it is

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things like UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32, a lower case letter in language, could be or look like a upper case letter in language,

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Yes, I just was looking at it with the nacked eye, didn’t see any difference

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Yeah. I’ll go into more detail…

I used the cryllic alphabet (see Ye, or A) to their ASCII lookalikes. This is known as a homoglyph attack – where it’s close enough, that the naked eye doesn’t realize the difference. Take for example:
apple.com vs аpple.com (which was taken down, and used the cryllic A)

The cryllic A apple website was harmless, and was an example of a homoglyph attack. It was migrated to a different website.

Can’t tell the difference, right? Well, a scam was done with this. It was called PayPaI. It impersonated PayPal, and since some systems had a capital “I” similar to a lowercase “l”, it caught thousands of people, and appeared in 2011, 2013 (both confirmed), and 2020 (source needed).

In fact, this is the same way I made:

var vаr = document.querySelector("a");;;
let lеt = window.open("https://x.com/");
// and
var integera = [0, 0, 0, 0,]//
for (let integerа = 0; integerа < integera.length; integerа++) {
if (integera[integerа] === 900) continue;
  integera[integerа]-=-900; ; ;;;;
};;

Happy coding, and hopefully don’t get homoglyph attack-ed!

(Edit: here’s a photograph)

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